Financing Graduate School

Given how much of a monetary commitment graduate school is, it’s best to find as many financial resources as possible.

Financing your graduate education is one of the critical factors when considering a graduate program. You want to make sure that you are getting the most out of your investment. But often it’s hard to know where to begin and what options are available. Tennessee Tech has a number of resources for graduate students. While a student can pursue taking out a loan, there are other options, including:

Graduate Assistantships

Diversity Fellowship

Other Federal Student Aid Funding Resources

Below are some tips from University of Maryland graduate, Joe Oudin:

1. Start thinking about your graduate school finances early.

Before you even begin applications, you should understand what loans you already have and consider what your financial situation might look like as a graduate student. If you’re considering graduate school at the same institution you attended for undergrad, look for opportunities to get graduate credit while you’re still an undergrad. When I was an undergraduate senior, my university allowed me to take graduate courses that counted toward my master’s degree and saved me thousands in future tuition expenses.

2. Learn about the different types of federal aid for graduate students.

Your federal aid package will probably be different than what you were offered as an undergraduate. FAFSA4caster can give you an idea of what types of federal aid you will qualify for. Graduate students have a variety of federal student aid options and are considered independent on the FAFSA. Make sure you complete your FAFSA on time. You might have to complete it even before you know your admission status.

3. Seek funding opportunities at your particular university or graduate program.

Individual schools offer a variety of graduate funding options such as scholarships, graduate assistantships, and graduate fellowships. These are sometimes a more significant source of aid for graduate students than federal aid. When you’re trying to decide on a graduate program, make sure you compare the types of funding offered to students. Once you commit to a graduate program, proactively seek funding opportunities from your program or university.

4. Be proactive and stay on top of everything.

I enrolled in a graduate program at the same university as my undergraduate study, so I expected a smooth transition. A few weeks after I committed to my graduate program, I received a notification from the university saying I was ineligible for financial aid. After a moment of panic, I realized there was no way that this could be true. It turned out that there was confusion in the school’s computer system because I was enrolled as both an undergraduate and a graduate. The problem was easily fixed when I called my school’s financial aid office. Despite submitting my FAFSA and all other paperwork correctly and on time, I still ran into a few speed bumps. With grad school, it is ultimately your responsibility to make sure that everything is submitted correctly and to follow up when necessary. Being proactive can make the financial aid process go much more smoothly.

Source: https://blog.ed.gov/2016/07/financial-aid-tips-for-graduate-students/

Traveling During Grad School

If you’re a grad student, it’s easy to come up with reasons not to travel.

It costs a lot (and you’re low on funds). It takes time (and you have a thesis to write). If you’re a teaching or research assistant, it requires time off from work (and your supervisor might not approve). But in spite of these obstacles, there are distinct benefits to traveling while you’re still in graduate school. Here’s why you should make the effort.

You’ll make useful connections

When you’re getting an advanced degree, it can feel like you’ll be in school forever. But believe it or not, the day will come when you’re sprung from the warm embrace of academia and will need to find a place for yourself in the thrilling world of work. And when that happens, it is really, really helpful to have a wide-flung network of people who are willing to help you make connections and set you up with relevant opportunities. How to build this network? Go on wide-flung adventures and build a network of like-minded people all over the world. Just don’t forget to follow up with them on LinkedIn or other social media networks in order to maintain those connections after arriving back home.

You’ll learn valuable skills

In today’s globalized economy, employers are looking for workers who are capable of making cross-cultural connections and keeping the big picture in mind at all times. Traveling is a great way to expand these abilities while building on other employable skills such as creative thinking, adaptability and problem solving, the ability to work independently, a willingness to embrace risks, and/or speaking a foreign language. Traveling while in school has also been shown to improve learning outcomes overall.

You’ll gain real-world perspective

Time spent in the field—either as part of a formal education experience or independent travel—can expose you to different research methodologies, help you uncover new interests that may inform your personal and professional goals moving forward, and provide you with real-world context for your chosen field of study. It’s one thing to study the impact of European colonialism in Quito, Ecuador or apartheid in Johannesburg, South Africa; it’s quite another to witness the long-term ramifications with your own two eyes.

You’ll master the art of self-presentation

Remember those connections we referenced above? Making them provides an awesome opportunity to get comfortable telling other people what you do and what you’re all about. Traveling to academic or industry conferences is a particularly great way to practice these professional conversations. Not only can you try out your elevator speech, but you can do so with colleagues and experts in your chosen field. (Do it politely enough, and they might even be willing to give you a few pointers.) By the time you get to your first job interview, talking about your professional achievements will feel like a piece of cake.

You’ll relieve stress

The life of a grad student is packed with all kinds of stressors, from worrying about grades and dissertation reviews to fretting over your employment prospects come graduation. Traveling presents a great way to escape from these stresses and gain some much-needed rejuvenation so that you’re able to avoid burnout and finish your degree with your health—and future prospects—still fully intact. Whether you’re traveling to Miami or Moscow, try to build in time for some quality R&R.

In addition to the benefits listed above, there’s some evidence that traveling as a student is so beneficial it may even predict higher grades in school and higher incomes later in life. Regardless of whether you ever uncover a direct correlation between your adventures and your pay grade, it’s clear that traveling is a great way to promote your long-term personal and professional success.

 

Source: https://www.hipmunk.com/tailwind/why-you-should-still-be-traveling-in-grad-school/

Finding Housing in Cookeville

If you’re from out of town, it’s important to explore all of your housing options before deciding on a place to live.

Luckily, Cookeville is a really cheap place to find housing. According to this site, Cookeville’s cost of living is decently lower than the U.S. average. In addition, Cookeville’s housing costs are even lower, with an average of $526 rent for a 1-bedroom apartment. But it’s important to know what will suit you best.

On-Campus Housing

Some students choose to stay on-campus due to the convenience of location, safety, and low-maintenance upkeep. Alcohol and smoking are prohibited, and students who choose to stay over semester breaks can make special housing arrangements with an additional daily charge.

Residence Halls

Tennessee Tech has on-campus residence halls  with semester rates ranging from $2,525 for a 1 person room in a traditional hall to $4,795 for a double room as a single room buyout in the new halls.

Tech Village Apartments

Students can also choose to live in a Tech Village Apartment, which is designed to feel more like an apartment and less like a dorm room. The rates are also a bit cheaper than the residence halls, ranging from $1,370 for a two-bedroom split between 4 people to $5,480 for a two-bedroom for one person.

Finding Housing Off-Campus

Many students choose to live in apartments or houses off-campus due to the high availability of affordable options. It’s important to figure out what kind of place you’re looking for by determining your preferences:

  • Price range
  • Number of bedrooms and bathrooms
  • Proximity to campus
  • Pets/no pets
  • Smoking/non-smoking
  • Utilities included/not included in rent
  • Washer/Dryer hookups or laundry service availability
  • Roommates/no roommates
  • Furnished/unfurnished
  • Wi-fi/internet availability
  • Other preferences

The following are some resources available for Cookeville housing:

http://www.homes.com/rentals/cookeville-tn/

https://cookeville.craigslist.org/search/apa

https://www.trulia.com/for_rent/Cookeville,TN/

http://www.rentalguide.net/Rentals/TN/City/Cookeville/Listings.html

https://hotpads.com/cookeville-tn/houses-for-rent

https://www.apartments.com/cookeville-tn/

http://www.homesandland.com/For-Rent/Cookeville,TN/

https://www.rentjungle.com/cookeville-tn-apartments-and-houses-for-rent/

 

Fall 2017 – Spring 2018 Calendar

Fall 2017 – Spring 2018 Calendar PDF

Fall 2017  

Last Day for International Applicants to Apply for Fall 2017 Admissions April 1, 12am CDT
Last Day for US Applicants to Apply for Fall 2017 Admissions July 1
New Graduate Student Orientation (TJ Farr room 205) 
  
August 22, 
  2pm-5:00pm 
Advisement and Registration August 24-25
Classes Begin August 28
Late Registration Begins ($100 late fee) August 28
Last Day to Register/Add a Class September 3
Last Day to Drop without a Grade September 10
Last Day to Apply for Fall Graduation September 11
GRE Test Info. Workshop (Johnson Hall Auditorium Room 103) September 14

3pm-4:30pm

Thesis/Dissertation Workshop (Johnson Hall Auditorium Room 103) September 28

3pm-4:30pm

FALL BREAK October 16-17
College of Graduate Studies Info Session (for all undergrad & graduate students, 
RUC Tech Pride Room 101)
October 24, 11am-12pm
College of Graduate Studies Info Session (for all TTU employees, RUC Tech Pride Room 101) October 24, 12pm-1pm
College of Graduate Studies Info Session (for all undergrad & graduate students) October 26,

morning 11am-12pm

afternoon 3pm-4pm

Last Day to Report Results of Comprehensive Exam & Thesis/Dissertation Defense November 10
Advisement for Spring November 6-10
Last Day to Drop a Class and Receive a Grade of “W” November 10
Last Day to submit Exception Request to Walk in Commencement November 10
Last Day to Submit Final Thesis/Dissertation November 17
Last Day to Submit signed Thesis/Dissertation Certificate of Approval November 17
Preregistration for Spring Begins November 13
HOLIDAY – Thanksgiving – No Classes, Offices Closed (Nov 23-24) November 22-24
Last Day to Submit any other Forms/Memos required for Graduation December 1
Last Day to Remove “Incomplete” grades if Graduating in December December 1
Last Day to Submit Survey of Earned Doctorate (Ph.D. Students) December 1
Last Day of Classes December 8
Final Exam Week December 11-14
Graduation Rehearsal, 4:00 p.m. at Hooper Eblen Center December 14
Graduation

9:30 a.m. – College of Arts and Sciences, College of Engineering, College of Interdisciplinary 
Studies, Whitson-Hester School of Nursing 
2:00 p.m. – College of Agriculture and Human Ecology, College of Business and College 
of Education

December 16
Early Course Selection for State Employees Using Fee Waiver or PC 191 
and Disabled/Elderly Program Participants – SPRING
December 21

 

Spring 2018

Last Day for International Applicants to Apply for Spring 2018 Admissions October 1
Last Day for US Applicants to Apply for Spring 2018 Admissions November 1
Advisement and Registration January 11-12
New Graduate Student Orientation – 1:30pm-5:00pm January  11
Martin Luther King Jr. Holiday – No Classes January 15
Classes Begin January 16
Late Registration Begins ($100 late fee) January 16 
Last Day to Register/Add a Class January 22
Last Day to Drop Without a Grade January 29
Last Day to Apply for Spring Graduation (No Applications after this date) February 5
SPRING BREAK March 5-9
Advisement for Summer and Fall 2018  March 26-30   
Last Day to Drop a Class and Receive a Grade of “W” March 30  
Last Day to submit Exception Request to Walk in Commencement March 30
Preregistration for Summer & Fall Begins April 2 
Last Day to Report Results of Comprehensive Exam & Thesis/Dissertation Defense April 9
Last Day to Submit Final Thesis/Dissertation April 16
Last Day to Submit signed Thesis/Dissertation Certificate of Approval April 16
Last Day to Submit any other Forms/Memos required for Graduation April 23
Last Day to Submit Survey of Earned Doctorate (Ph.D. Students) April 23
Last Day to Remove “Incomplete” grades if Graduating in August April 27
Last Day of Classes April 27  
Final Exam Week April 30 – May 3  
Graduation Rehearsal, 4:00 p.m. at Hooper Eblen Center May 3
Graduation 
9:30 a.m. – College of Arts and Sciences, College of Engineering, College of Interdisciplinary 
Studies, Whitson-Hester School of Nursing 
2:00 p.m. – College of Agriculture and Human Ecology, College of Business and College 
of Education
May 5