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10 Positive Ways to Deal With Post-Grad Anxiety

Graduating from college is a bittersweet experience. Follow these tips to ease your anxiety about the next phase (hint: it’s all gonna be alright).
Everyone knows graduating from college is bittersweet. Although it’s a special time to celebrate your accomplishments and look ahead to your future, it’s also a time where you have to say goodbye to friendships, a consistent routine, and (often grueling) term papers.
What no tells you about life after college is the rollercoaster of emotions you experience after graduation. Even if you’ve landed a great job, found an apartment, and can even afford to start paying back your student loans without giving up your coffee addiction, it’s not unusual to still feel lost in your career or who you are as a young adult.
What no tells you about life after college is the rollercoaster of emotions you experience after graduation.
Post-grad anxiety often impacts those of us who are having a difficult time transitioning into adulthood. Whether it’s stressing about finding a job or feeling unsure about your chosen career path, it’s really easy to fall into a funk after graduation. And believe it or not, even those of us who seem to have it all together can experience this type of post-grad stress.
What’s important to remember, however, is that you’re not alone in this journey. Post-grad anxiety happens to many young adults. If you’ve been feeling a little stressed or having some doubts about your goals, here are some positive ways to deal with the anxiety you may experience upon graduating from college:

1. Take a Deep Breath and Think About Everything You’ve Just Accomplished

As soon as you graduate from college, it’s super easy to obsess over your “five-year plan”, or perhaps the fact that you don’t have a plan in place at all. Before you start worrying about where you want to be in the next five years, focus on the fact that you’ve just graduated from college—an accomplishment, in and of itself!

2. Stop Comparing Yourself to Others

One of the biggest lessons you’ll learn after college is that every person will reach success at his or her own rate. Although you’ll have friends who excel in their careers faster than you, it’s important that you don’t compare yourself to others and their successes. Everyone (even and especially you) will have a moment to shine. Just be patient and the right opportunity will come your way.
Everyone (even and especially you) will have a moment to shine. Just be patient and the right opportunity will come your way.

3. Invest in Something You’re Passionate About

As a college student, you probably didn’t have much time to do the things you truly love. If you’re passionate about cooking, painting, or even playing a sport, find a way to bring those hobbies back into your life. Investing yourself in your passions is a great way to re-energize and regain focus.

4. Start a New Hobby Outside of Your Comfort Zone

On the other hand, if you’re struggling to find something you’re passionate about, explore a new interest. Whether it’s signing up for a hot yoga class or learning how to grow an herb garden, experiment with new hobbies. Who knows, you might discover a new passion and make some new friends along the way!
5. Surround Yourself With Friends
Don’t lose touch with the valuable relationships you made in college. Even if you’re hundreds of miles away from everyone, don’t let your closest relationships disappear. These people will always be here for you, especially when you need them most.

6. Focus on the Present

Remember that five-year plan mentioned earlier? Well, it might be a good idea to put it on hold for now. Instead of getting caught up in your future self, start creating the person you dream of being today. Live in the moment and appreciate the simple things in your life, and most importantly, think about everything you can be grateful for right now.

7. Don’t Sweat the Big Stuff

One of the biggest stressors of being an adult is coping with student loan debt. Although this seems like a huge weight on your shoulders, don’t allow it to consume your life. Remember, there will always be a way to make your payments, even if it means picking up a second part-time job.

8. Don’t Neglect Your Body and Mind

A positive attitude begins with a healthy body and mind. While it might seem like common sense, make sure you’re eating healthy, getting enough exercise, and giving yourself adequate sleep. After college, your body will start telling you that it can’t do all-nighters or thrive off of junk food anymore. When you focus on creating the best version of yourself—inside and out—you’ll feel more positive about your goals.

9. Cross Something Off Your Bucket List

Have you ever wanted to run a half marathon? Is it one of your dreams to write a book? Whatever has been on your bucket list, now is the perfect time to cross it off. By investing your energy in goals outside of your career, you’ll discover a whole new meaning to personal accomplishments.

10. Trust the Journey

There will be many highs and lows during your first year in the post-grad world. Whether it’s landing a dream job or dealing with your car breaking down, have trust that everything will be OK in the end.
Transitioning into the post-grad world doesn’t have to be overwhelming. As long as you believe in yourself and trust what the future holds, everything will work out just fine.
You’ll also discover that the moment you stop worrying about how everything “should” be, you’ll see more opportunities to create the life you’ve always dreamed of living.

Source: https://www.careercontessa.com/advice/how-to-deal-post-grad-anxiety/

Summer Vacation: 30 Ways Students Can Make the Most of Free Time

This was a stressful year for families and students need the summer to rest and relax.

But THEIR down time during the summer months can sometimes collide with the real responsibilities we have as parents. Plus, there is only so much Netflix teens can watch until boredom takes over. Your teen may actually welcome ideas of productive things to do.

Here are 30 ways that students can make the most of summer vacation. While some projects and activities pertain to college students, many are things that middle school and high school students can do.

(Hint: Print it out and leave it near the remote control where they are sure to find it.)

How students can use free time this summer

Some students may have found work this summer, but, if they still have time on their hands, here are ideas for how to use their free time.

1. Look for a internship or job for the fall or for after graduation

If you are currently a college student or will be attending this fall, visit the career counseling website. Career services is an underutilized area on campus that undergraduates should begin using from freshman year on.  You cannot start the process too soon.

2. Create a LinkedIn profile

LinkedIn is ground zero for many employers who scan the database for students with qualifications that match their needs. Some jobs require LinkedIn just to apply. Find a suitable (not holding a solo cup) profile picture and create an account. If you have an account already, is it up to date? And yes, high school students can create a profile.

3. Update your resume

If you’ve not needed a resume to get a summer job you will need one in college. Check your college’s career counseling website for resources or if you need more help, Handshake is a good place to start.

4. Donate or resell old books and textbooks

Barnes & Noble Textbooks has a buy-back program that is easy and includes free shipping. Locate the ISBN number on each book and type it into a link on the site to discover if there is any resell value. You will get a quote on the spot and a shipping label.  All you need is a shipping box and a little time to gather all the books you no longer need or want. Cash4Books is another site to look at to see if you can get more money for books.

5. Increase your computer skills

For students who want to make the most of their screen time, we highly recommend ID Tech Virtual Tech Camps. It’s our go-to place for learning about different STEM disciplines and enhancing computer skills.

6. Spend time with younger siblings

If you’ve been away at college, you may not realize how much you’ve been missed by your younger siblings. You will always be their much-admired big brother or sister so set up board games, plan movie nights, or surprise your parents with cooking dinner together with them. Make memories this summer for all of you.

7. Visit grandparents

Other than your parents, these adults have loved you with all their hearts since your very first breath. Now is the time to visit them in person and give them that bear hug and the companionship they have missed for the last 18 months.

8. Take the car in for servicing

Is there a family car that you are allowed to use? When does the inspection sticker expire? Does the oil need changing? How about getting it washed? Take part in the maintenance of the car and, if your parents are letting you drive it to college in the fall, look at this checklist to make sure you are ready for the road trip.

9. Gather and sell old electronics

Chargers, old iPods, phones, cases, games and game systems, CD’s can all bring money if you spend a little time and research who buys what. Learn how to gather and recycle old electronics and read what Best Buy can take. The Amazon Trade In Program is a one stop shop for trade-ins.

10. Get a jump on reading for the fall semester

Do you have fall courses that are reading-intensive? Why not get a jump on academics by picking one of the books off the reading list and finishing it before class begins. Besides, you can never waste time reading a quality book.

11. Go through school mementos and cull them

Clutter is the enemy and you are the only one who can fight the battle between what stays and what goes in your old room. Perhaps some of those programs, pictures, knickknacks that once seemed so precious to you have lost a little luster. Time to trash things now.

12. Make a digital book or 2022 calendar

When was the last family vacation that you took with your parents and siblings? With the pandemic curtailing travel, that trip might be even more meaningful than you realized at the time! Why not create a photo book or calendar for 2023 with pics that are living on your phone? If you want to save the project for the holidays or an upcoming birthday, you will be way ahead with this project in the bank. Shutterfly has easy templates.

13. Research study abroad options

if you’re planning on studying abroad, this is the ideal time to research programs, both ones that your college offers and others that are available elsewhere. Ask around for recommendations from other students and see what advice they have for you.

14. Get safety training

Look at the Red Cross website or visit your local YMCA’s website and see if there are any programs offered that can lead to certification in CPR, first aid, or lifeguarding. Many options have both online and unperson options.

15. Research graduate programs and requirements

You may find it hard to see beyond life as a college student, but if you think that graduate school is in your future somewhere down the road, take the time to look at a few university websites. Find out about required entrance exams, average GPAs, undergraduate course work required, firms that recruit at the school…. understanding more about grad programs might give you more focus as a college student.

16. Consign or donate clothes

Are any of your clothes or accessories consignment-worthy? Alternatively, if they are still wearable but you no longer have any need for them, look for a Goodwill, or local charity that can use what you no longer need.

17. Learn to cook

Time in the kitchen is never wasted and the best way to learn to cook is to, simply, cook. Your parents have been the ones planning, shopping for and preparing meals for decades. Why not take over the responsibilities for a few evenings and master some new recipes at the same time? Maybe your parents would be willing to sign up for a meal subscription service like Blue Apron IF you do the cooking.

18. Help your neighbors

There’s never been a better time to reach out to your neighbors to see if they could use your help this summer. Elderly neighbors, in particular, might need someone to run errands, grocery shop, or take care of walking their dog.

19. Create an exercise routine

If you’ve never gotten in the habit, this could be a perfect time to begin to exercise so that when school begins again, you have a healthy new habit for the fall. There are infinite online options that offer guided instruction with varying length of class times and types – strength, core, yoga, aerobic, and more. Plus, with gyms opening up again, the options are endless.

20. Set goals

It’s the perfect time to think about what you hope to accomplish during the school year 2021-22. Think about goals that are short-term academic ones but also think about longer-term goals, too. Start by reading this newly-released bestseller, The Defining Decade: Why Your Twenties Matter and How to Make the Most of Them, by Dr. Meg Jay.

21. Make a budget

Create a spreadsheet and sit with your parents to review your financial needs for the summer and the fall. This is a very good exercise to do, especially if you’re going to college this fall and will need to manage more of your own finances.

22. Plan a family excursion

Although summer feels like it will go on forever, there are only so many weekends when your entire family might be free to gather for an outing. These are memories your family will cherish.

23. Assemble two interview-worthy outfits

When it’s time to meet with for a job interview, you’ll need to project a professional appearance. For virtual interviews, make sure you’re ready with Zoom tops or jackets.  Go through your closet and see what fits, what needs to be tailored and cleaned. If you need to shop, look for stores that offer student discounts.

24. Get the old gang together

Take the initiative, send out a few texts and plan a get together this summer. The time for face-to-face gatherings is now!

25. Doctors appointments

Have you outgrown the pediatrician’s office with the toys scattered around the waiting room floor? Talk to your parents about switching to an internist for your next appointment. While you’re at it, do you need to see a dentist, dermatologist, the eye doctor, a gynecologist? Stop asking your mom to make these appointments for you and get them on your calendar.

26. Internships

Are you looking for an internship this summer? Many firms have shorter internships that start mid-summer.

27. Check in with your high school guidance counselor

As a college student, you can be a helpful resource for current high school students, especially since so many student have NOT been able to visit campuses in person. Let your counselor know you’re willing to offer advice and counsel.

28. A dose of culture

Are there museums in your hometown (or nearby) which you haven’t visited since you were in 3rd grade? Maybe it’s time to give culture another shot especially since you can visit in person.

29. Give your dog a bath

Take on the messy responsibility of bath time and enjoy the one-on-one with your best buddy. While you’re at it, take a close look at what it costs to own and take care of a dog. Many students love the IDEA of a dog but are shocked at how expensive it is to buy food and pay for wellness care.

30. Volunteer your time

If you can volunteer in your community this might be THE very best way to spend summer vacation. There are also virtual volunteer opportunities to explore.

Source: https://grownandflown.com/winter-break-31-ways-students-make-most-of-january/

Adjusting To Life After Grad School

The five tips listed below offer links to helpful resources and methods of preparing for the stresses of the job search, life after school, and how to cope with inevitable emotional and professional challenges.

    1. Make time for yourself: According to a Harvard study, by the time students enter their final years of graduate school, up to 25 percent experience moderate or severe symptoms of depression. Upon graduation, these symptoms don’t necessarily disappear. In her article “The Grief of Graduation,” Anne Guarnera discusses graduate students’ feelings of loss upon finishing their programs. For the most part, she considers these feelings to be a loss of student identity and all the social and spatial connections that one develops while spending three to six years in a town, city or campus environment. When we graduate, many of us move elsewhere. We leave the area in search of a new job, to find a fresh landscape to begin the next chapter or even move in with family or friends to save money. Whatever the scenario, Guarnera suggests that we all need to practice emotional self-care as a means of dealing with these transitions. To do so, she urges us to schedule time to organize our thoughts and process the changes in our lives.
    2. Prepare early: While you’re still in school, take advantage of career-focused resources available through your program. These resources include career planning and coaching, interview workshops, job fairs and networking opportunities. If your department or school doesn’t have free services readily available, you can reach out to professors for help in this area. Many of them will be glad to offer advice on how to prepare for the job market and help you avoid any mistakes they may have made.
    3. Change your perspective on graduate school: Many students, especially first-generation graduate degree seekers, approach graduate school as an extension of their undergraduate program. Nathaniel Lambert argues that students should treat their post-baccalaureate training as more of an apprenticeship instead of “school” as they’ve traditionally conceptualized it. This concept comes from the middle ages when craftspeople would study with masters of a trade and learn by imitating their techniques and processes. Lambert suggests that graduate learning should be no different and, whenever possible, we should learn by doing, “not simply by reading about it and talking about it in classes.” As a result, we may be better prepared for the transition into our careers upon graduation.
    4. Remember: Your thesis or dissertation doesn’t guarantee you a job: While creating a well-formulated, written document based on original research that contributes in some way to your field is important, it’s best to keep that work in perspective. Whether you pursue a career in academia, at a Fortune 500 company or in a research laboratory, there’s little chance that anyone wants to hear about your thesis or dissertation in detail. That said, it’s still essential that you create a thorough and meaningful project. Bear in mind, however, most employers want to know how your knowledge and expertise makes you a good fit for a position. At this point in your career, they want to know what makes you a good problem-solver, teacher, researcher, etc. You need to tell them how you can meet and exceed these expectations and not simply show them what you’ve written in the past.
    5. Cultivate a support system and friendship: Our expert, Rebecca Newman, urges professionals after graduate school to find trusted individuals outside of work with whom they can share their personal, academic or professional frustrations. “Have a strong support network when entering a new field after graduate school. This can take the form of family, friends, a partner or a mentor. They can offer you support that will keep your ’dirty laundry’ out of your workplace,” Newman says. “You might think you’re venting to a friend in the form of a colleague, but it can be more professionally advantageous to look at work as being ’on stage.’ If you have a valid concern, you should absolutely bring it up at work in a thoughtful, constructive manner.”

How to Prepare for Final Exams: 14 Top (and Easy!) Tips

For many of us, finals week is a nightmare of stress and anxiety. To prevent this experience from becoming overwhelming, we’ve put together this top guide to final exam preparation so you can walk in on test day full of confidence!

1. Begin Early, at Least One Month in Advance

You should always begin studying for your final exams at least a month prior to finals week. Then, you won’t have to rush to squeeze it in as your exams approach.

Too many students put off studying for finals until the last moment, toiling in all-night cram sessions. This is not only stressful but also ineffective! Research shows that breaking up your study sessions into smaller chunks over time enhances performance.

2. Create a Finals Game Plan

Creating a study schedule helps you to plan your studies so you can use your time efficiently. Be specific and organized, outlining when and how you will review your subjects, for example:

Monday:

10-11:30: Review chapters 1-3 psychology textbook

11:30-12:30: Break

12:30-2: Re-read psychology notes

2-5: Test exam: psychology

The best strategy is to break up your studies into shorter, focused sessions with regular breaks. This helps you resist distractions and focus better when you are studying. Allowing yourself to recharge and relax in-between conserves your energy and releases stress. Write out your strategy and place it somewhere you’ll see it often so you have a regular reminder to keep you on track.

3. Change up Your Study Space

Without a doubt, it’s essential to have a quiet, peaceful study space. However, research has shown that varying where you study actually improves learning. Shake up your routine! Try studying in different rooms in your house or apartment, or alternate between the study area, the library, your favorite cafe, and the public park. It will help you to retain what you need to know and keep you energized, so your finals prep doesn’t become a chore.

4. Categorize Your Lessons in Order of Importance

Prioritize the lessons that you find difficult. Spend extra time studying for more challenging classes. For example, if you’re struggling in math or physics, tackle those subjects first. Later, you can review your English or art history lessons, and they will be a breeze!

Remember, you don’t have to devote equal time to every subject. Spend more time where you need to, and you won’t get an unpleasant shock at finals time.

5. Use Study Apps

There are so many great study apps available that are either free or inexpensive, so why not take advantage of them? There are apps that create flashcards, show maps, the periodic table of elements, and replace graphic calculators. These all help to optimize your study and inject an added element of fun to keep you motivated.

6. Take Advantage of the Review Session

Is your professor offering you a review session for the upcoming exam? If so, you should definitely go. They’ll cover the material you will be tested on, allowing you to focus on what you need to know for the final. You will also receive detailed information on the format and be able to ask any questions you have at the end.

7. Go to Group Study Sessions

Let’s face it; we don’t all learn the same way. Whatever your learning style, studying with others has benefits that we shouldn’t ignore. Having others to bounce ideas off or a friend’s talent in a difficult subject can be advantageous for your own understanding of the subject material. Two heads are often better than one!

If your class doesn’t already have a study group, why not organize one? You could meet in the library, a coffee shop, the park, or someone’s home. Chances are, your classmates will be happy to join.

8. Study Your Notes

When going over your notes, it’s a good idea to outline and reorganize important information. This will help you focus on what’s important and ignore what’s unnecessary. Highlighters are useful for this, allowing you to pick out the most vital information you are likely to need. You can then use your notes for regular review and transfer the highlighted information to flashcards for last-minute scanning.

9. Utilize Handy Creative Aids for Memorization

There is a wide variety of memorization — or mnemonic — techniques for remembering difficult information. One mnemonic phrase I learned in music class for the treble notes E, G, B, D, F was “Every Good Boy Deserves Fun.” There are many phrases and acronyms like this, and you can also make up your own! Similar techniques include formulating a story to memorize historical figures on an exam.

10. Take Practice Tests

Studies have shown that doing practice tests improves testing performance in final exams. While not everyone has equal access to practice tests, using flashcards or being quizzed is also highly effective. If there is nobody around to quiz you, quiz yourself! Simulate testing conditions to sharpen your focus and performance. You will master the material and get your mind “in shape” for test day.

11. Make It Fun

Studying for final exams can be a bore for many, but with a bit of imagination, you can make it interesting! Play games, socialize while you review, create acronyms, use learning apps, and take quizzes with a partner to energize your finals preparation. An excellent motivator is to reward yourself for an hour of study or a correct answer with a piece of chocolate or a cup of your favorite coffee.

12. Listen to Recordings

Another effective way to prepare is to listen to recordings, whether it is a recording of your professor’s lectures, yourself reading your study notes, or a podcast on the topic. Recordings break up your study routine and are particularly helpful for auditory learners. It also lets you do other things, such as driving or housework, as long as you are not too distracted.

13. Give Yourself a Break

When studying, make sure to give yourself at least a five-minute break every hour to remain fresh. Your brain uses a lot of glucose during all that hard work, so it needs time to replenish itself regularly. Take a walk, stretch, do something else for a few minutes to catch your breath. Also, getting enough sleep is vital if you are going to be able to concentrate. Eight hours is ideal. Don’t pull “all-nighter” study sessions — it harms you more than it helps.

14. Say Yes to Good Food and Exercise

Perhaps the most overlooked aspect of doing well on your exams is nutrition and exercise. Eat enough fruit and vegetables, fiber, healthy snacks such as nuts and yogurt, drink plenty of water, and avoid too much heavy, processed food and sugar. Research shows a poor diet impairs test performance. Also, get enough exercise. Just 30 minutes of cardio is enough to improve your memory.

The approach of final exams is a source of dread for many students, but it really doesn’t have to be! Follow these tips to improve your scores, enhance your learning, and defuse the stress that is all-too-common at test time. You will be glad you did!

EDITING: TIPS FOR REVISING AND POLISHING YOUR RESEARCH PAPER

Editing is an integral part of the writing process that improves the quality of drafts by making the content clear, precise, accurate, and impactful. The editors will assess your manuscript and research paper on the basis of language quality, clarity, and information presentation.

The editing process includes correcting grammar, punctuation, and spelling errors along with improving the overall writing style and structure so that the target audience can comprehend the content.

The question is how will you edit your research paper? Here are four strategies to help authors edit their drafts from a technical perspective.

  • 1. Purpose of editing
  • 2. Maintain logic and coherence
  • 3. Edit in phases
  • 4. Content analysis

1. Purpose of editing

Identify the purpose of editing and revising the document. Is to organize the sections? Do you want to make the content more engaging and convincing? Or is it to fix English language errors? Identifying the areas that need improvement will help adopt a more precise approach.

Editing tips for beginners:
  • 1. Identify the major areas of concern in the draft and work on it first
  • 2. Create an editing checklist to ensure you have followed the journal guidelines
  • 3. Have a second look at the sentence while adding or deleting any word

2. Maintain logic and coherence

There is a  possibility that your ideas may no longer be clear and well-defined as you continue to write. It is important that all the ideas are interlinked with each other and make sense. There should be a continuity and smooth flow of ideas within the paragraphs.

Tips for maintaining logic and coherence:
  • 1. Read the paragraphs aloud, which will help you identify the problem areas
  • 2. Use transition words and phrases carefully to establish a link between sentences and paragraphs
  • 3. Focus on explaining one idea at a time

3. Edit in phases

Work on one section at a time instead of editing the entire paper in one go. Create a schedule and edit the sections based on their length and word count. This will help you focus on the core elements and content of your manuscript.

Tips for editing in phases:
  • 1. Pick one section at a time while editing the document and look for common language errors
  • 2. Ensure each section conveys the original meaning intended
  • 3. Remove unnecessary information and redundant words

4. Content analysis

Once you are done with the final draft, analyze the content and ensure that it matches with the formatting and styling guidelines of the journal. Review the content for redundancy, wordiness, and accuracy.

Tips for analyzing content:
  • 1. Re-write sentences with modifiers
  • 2. Use active voice to describe the methodology and adopt a step-by-step process
  • 3. Keep the sentences short and to the point

Checklist to help you edit your next research paper:

  • 1. Correct the run-on sentences
  • 2. Check sentences for subject–verb agreement
  • 3. Use a spell check for identifying spelling mistakes
  • 4. Check abbreviations and punctuation marks
  • 5. Avail professional editing and proofreading services

Source: https://www.authorassists.com/blog/editing-tips-for-revising-and-polishing-your-research-paper/

How to Land Your First Job After College

Securing that first job after college can be a daunting prospect for many seniors and recent graduates. However, you can take charge of the process by following a few simple tips and strategies to land a job that will help get your career off to a positive start.

Check With Your Career Center

Begin by tapping the resources that are available to you as a student or recent graduate from your college. Visit the career office and meet with a career advisor to discuss your options.

You can also pursue career counseling if you’re unsure of your goals. Advisors can help you develop resumes and cover letters, prepare for interviews, and formulate a job search plan suited to your interests.

Colleges also host visits from individual recruiters, hold career fairs on campus, offer recruitment events in key cities, and sponsor alumni networking programs.

Start Networking

Networking can be one of the most effective ways to land a job. In fact, a joint survey conducted by LinkedIn and The Adler Group revealed that 85% of all jobs are obtained through networking.

The best approach is often an indirect one, such as reaching out to contacts for information and advice rather than directly asking people to hire you.

Contact as many professionals as you can for informational consultations. Get lists of alumni volunteers from your career office or alumni association, attend networking events and ask alumni with whom you develop a rapport if you can follow up with them to gain further insight into their work environment.

Touch base with past employers, coaches, faculty, clergy, and others who have observed you in any productive capacity. Ask if they have any contacts in your fields of interest who you could contact for information and advice.

You can also do some networking virtually through digital platforms such as LinkedIn.

Create a LinkedIn Profile

Not only is LinkedIn a great place to build a network, but it also serves as another way to showcase what you have to offer, build your personal brand, search and apply for jobs, and connect with recruiters and potential employers. You can also join any LinkedIn groups for your college and reach out to alumni in fields of interest.

You can create a LinkedIn profile while you’re still in school and build it from there. Even without any work experience, you can still highlight your skills, education, extracurricular activities, internships, and volunteer opportunities, and even ask people for recommendations.

Develop a Professional Website

Creating your own website can serve many purposes. It’s a platform that you own where you can express your personality with your own branding, showcase your skills with a portfolio of work samples, and demonstrate your knowledge through a blog or other content you create.

More than half of all hiring managers are more impressed by a job candidate’s personal website than any other personal branding tool, according to Forbes.

You can buy a domain name from one of many hosting sites and use a tool such as Squarespace, Wix, or WordPress to develop your site or hire one to create one for you.

Join a Professional Group

Join an official organization related to your field or industry as a student member if you’re still in college or as a professional member after you graduate. Many colleges have chapters of national associations, and if there’s not one for the one you want to join, you may be able to start one.

Many professional associations put on conferences where you can rub shoulders with seasoned pros who are often eager to help newcomers to their field. Volunteer to help run the registration table, and you will meet lots of potentially helpful people. You may even find a mentor.

Fortune 500 companies acknowledge the value of having mentors: 71% of them have a mentoring program of some sort, according to Terri A. Scandura, a management professor and dean of the graduate school at the University of Miami. Many well-known, successful people have had mentors:

  • Media mogul Oprah Winfrey was mentored by author Maya Angelou.
  • Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg was mentored by Apple Inc. CEO Steve Jobs.
  • Astronaut and former U.S. Senator John Glenn was mentored by his high school physics teacher.
  • Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates was mentored by Berkshire Hathaway CEO Warren Buffett.
  • Baseball Hall of Fame inductee Cal Ripken, Jr. was mentored by his father, Cal Ripken, Sr.

Arrange a Job Shadow

After you have a positive networking meeting with someone, try to arrange a job shadow day as a follow-up. It will help you get an insider’s view of what it would be like to work that job and also give you an idea of whether you’d like to work at that specific company. You’ll also likely meet lots of people and have the chance to make some positive impressions and connections.

Have an Elevator Pitch Ready

Take stock of your strongest interests and skills and be prepared to tell people who you meet some interesting things about yourself to grab their attention. Think of it as a 30-second commercial.

For example, you might say “I am an English major who loves to write. I’ve organized and promoted a lot of concerts and fundraising events for my campus singing group. I also love to follow fashion trends and helped to coordinate the annual campus fashion show sponsored by my sorority.”

Find Companies You Would Like to Work For

Identify employers of interest and visit the employment section of their website and look for college student or graduate opportunities.

Check to see if your college has any alumni working at your target organizations and ask for their advice about accessing jobs there. Your career and alumni offices can help you to identify alumni by organization, and you can also use the alumni function on LinkedIn to identify some contacts.

Use job sites like Indeed.com to generate more job leads. Identify specialized or niche job boards for your field to find more listings.

Target Your Resume and Cover Letter

As your career goals begin to crystallize, develop versions of your resume that are targeted to specific jobs. Showcase the skills, experiences, coursework, and projects mostly related to your emerging job objectives.

Avoid generic cover letters. Instead, take the time to write a targeted cover letter to make a special case for how each job matches your interests and skills. Get feedback and advice from advisors and mentors, and always carefully proofread your documents.

Organize Your Job Search

Treat your job search like an actual job, and get organized. Keep a database of all your applications and contacts.

Schedule 10 hours per week for job searching while you are in school. Increase the time you spend 20 hours a week during breaks and after graduation.

Line Up an Internship

Internship sponsors often hire from their past roster of interns. In fact, paid internships lead to job offers for over 66% of college grads who have them, according to research from the National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE).

Considering this, it’s wise to try and get at least one internship right out of college. If you find that you’re underqualified for your target job at graduation, then explore the possibility of doing an internship for the summer or fall after graduation.

Even if your internship doesn’t lead to a job offer, it will give you the opportunity to gain valuable skills and contacts. If cash flow is an issue, be sure to apply to paid internships, or pair a part-time internship with a basic paying job.

Keep Balance in Your Life

Finally, endeavor to retain some balance in your life while you are in job search mode. Exercise, follow a healthy diet, get enough sleep and continue to pursue your outside interests in order to keep your energy level up and maintain a positive state of mind.

Finding that perfect first job may take some time, but making a good match will be worth your preparation and patience.

Source: https://www.thebalancecareers.com/how-to-land-your-first-job-after-college-2059853

7 Things To Do Before the End of the Semester

With the end of yet another semester fast approaching, there’s sure to be a growing number of tasks to check off your to-do list before the semester truly does end. From taking care of last-minute administrative details to finishing finals week off strong to completing a bucket list of fun things to do on your campus, there are so many things to do. To ensure you end this semester on a good note, read on for some helpful suggestions and tasks to check off your list.

1. Return your rental textbooks.

Most likely at the beginning of the semester, you rented some textbooks for your classes because renting is cheaper than buying. Now, it’s time to return those rentals before the deadline so you can avoid any late fees. Returning rentals is usually a fairly simple process. Whether you rented books from a textbook rental company or from your university’s bookstore, all you have to do is check their rental return policies and follow the instructions.

2. Study for finals.

What inevitably comes at the end of every semester is finals. While you may not want to make studying for final exams at the top of your list, it is undeniably a very important part of closing out the semester on a strong note. Set aside the appropriate amount of time in your schedule to really buckle down and study hard.

Even if you’re one of the lucky few who don’t have final exams or papers, it’s still always a good idea to finish strong. Take advantage of all the academic resources available at your university to do well in your classes. For instance, if you’re struggling in a certain class or subject, don’t hesitate to turn to peer tutors who work at your university. They are there to help you and have gone through the same or similar coursework as you are. You should also take advantage of the career center at your school to gain some advice and insight on your future career path. No matter what stage of college you’re in — whether you’re about to finish freshman year or are about to graduate and enter the real world — you can definitely benefit from a visit to the career center.

3. Pay a visit to your academic advisor.

In the same vein, it’s also a good idea to visit your academic advisor before the semester ends. After all, you want to make sure you have all your affairs in order before the next semester starts. Taking care of business includes making sure you’re on track to graduate, registering for classes you need for next semester, and possibly even asking for career advice (you know, in case you wanted extra guidance after going to the career center).

4. Clean up your room/start packing.

In addition to taking care of school-related things, it’s important to handle your living situation. If you live in a dorm on campus, you’ll have to start thinking about moving out soon — and that means packing up your things to be ready to leave by the end of the semester. While it may be difficult to start packing everything in your room, since you’ll still need a lot of essentials (bathroom things, clothes, shoes, etc.), you can definitely start putting away certain things in your room that you won’t need for the last few weeks. Maybe you still have some winter clothes that you never took home earlier in the semester, which you can easily pack away in bins, bags, or boxes (whatever you prefer). Another good tip is to get rid of things you no longer use, such as papers from old assignments, garbage, etc. — basically, anything lying around that no longer has a use or could definitely stand to be thrown out. If you put up any command hooks, posters, pictures, or anything of that sort during the semester, it’s also a good idea to take those down before the semester ends.

If you live in an apartment or house off campus and won’t be staying over the summer, you should also take steps to start cleaning up your place. Make sure you abide by all the rules laid out by your landlord and take all your belongings with you when you move out.

5. Spend time outside.

Usually, the end of the semester is accompanied by warmer weather, which means an excuse to stay outside more often. In the midst of all the studying and homework you have to do, take a break by spending more time outside in the nice weather. You may just find yourself feeling more relaxed and at peace with the semester coming to a close.

6. Make time to hang out with your friends.

What goes along with taking a break and relaxing is making time to hang out with friends. Chances are that at least some of your friends from college don’t live near you and may even be scattered across the country (or across the world!), so now is the time to take advantage of being near them and spend time hanging out.

7. Apply for summer jobs and/or internships.

As the summer approaches, applying for summer jobs and/or internships is definitely a good idea. Searching for something to do over the summer will get you ahead of the game so you can not only earn money but also start doing things to potentially jumpstart your future career.

As the end of the semester draws closer and closer, there are many things you can do to prepare for the end of another school year. Make sure you’re ready by staying organized and ahead of the game!

Source: https://www.uloop.com/news/view.php/274655/7-Things-To-Do-Before-the-End-of-the-Semester

Top 7 Reasons to Take Summer Classes

For many college students, summer means a time of relaxation. It’s time to reset, recharge, and take a break from classes. Some go on a summer vacation or back home to visit their family and friends while others decide to stay put and unwind.

However, one thing to consider is filling the time – or part of the time – with summer classes.

Here are some benefits of taking a summer session for you to consider:

1. You’ll usually graduate faster.

Taking classes over the summer gives you the opportunity to earn more credits, which can bring you that much closer to graduation. If you don’t have anything else going on during the summer, why not use that time to be productive and work toward finishing your degree sooner?

2. More availability.

While it’s true that course selections in general can be more limited during the summer, you may not have to fight your way into a spot for what is being offered. This means that even those highly coveted classes will have a lot more availability, which makes it much easier to take popular courses that are required for your degree.

3. Smaller classes.

Popular courses during the spring and fall semesters usually mean jam-packed classrooms. This can make it difficult to get a good seat, pay attention to lectures, ask questions, and have one-on-one discussions with your professor. Because fewer students opt for summer sessions, it also often means smaller classes. Not having to fight for a parking spot is a pretty great perk, too!

4. Cheaper textbooks.

Textbook prices might not be lower during the summer, but it could be easier to find used books. Most college students know that buying used textbooks can save them a bundle, but that’s the issue – most college students know it. That can make it difficult to find used textbooks at the college bookstore, especially for popular classes. It can even be hard to find them online, especially if you try to order them after the semester starts. Because fewer students attend the summer session, this means you won’t have to make a mad dash to the bookstore.

5. It can be a great time to take on classes you’re dreading.

Summer sessions are much shorter than typical semesters, and you’ll often finish up in about half the time you would any other time during the year. This can be either a good or bad thing, depending on how you look at it. The shorter semester usually means the class will meet more often and/or class sessions will be longer than usual. For some students, it can be overwhelming to fit an entire semester’s worth of work into half the time. But if you’re up for the challenge, you’ll probably be happy you did it in the end. Before you know it, the session will be over, and you’ll be done with those courses.

6. The potential to study abroad.

If you wanted to travel during the summer but you also like the idea of earning course credits, why not do both by studying abroad? Many study abroad programs take place during the summer, so depending on what your school offers, it could be your best opportunity. Studying abroad offers an experience like no other, and it may be something you want to seriously consider doing during your college career.

7. The opportunity to take on an internship.

Similar to study abroad programs, many internship programs are offered during the summer. If you are lucky enough to land an internship, you can gain invaluable experience in the industry you want to work in, and sometimes even get paid for it. Although you might not technically be in a classroom or on campus during the summer, you might still be able to earn credits during summer session this way.

If you do decide to enroll in a summer session, you’ll need to think about how to pay for it. If you’ve already reached your annual federal student loan limit, you may have other options, such as taking out a private student loan. Check out College Ave Student Loans to see the different loan options available, and see how you can build a loan that fits your budget and your life.

Source: https://www.collegeavestudentloans.com/blog/top-7-reasons-take-summer-classes/

The Benefits of Taking Summer Classes

For many college students, summer means a time of relaxation. It’s time to reset, recharge, and take a break from classes. Some go on a summer vacation or back home to visit their family and friends while others decide to stay put and unwind.

However, one thing to consider is filling the time – or part of the time – with summer classes.

Here are some benefits of taking a summer session for you to consider:

1. You’ll usually graduate faster.

Taking classes over the summer gives you the opportunity to earn more credits, which can bring you that much closer to graduation. If you don’t have anything else going on during the summer, why not use that time to be productive and work toward finishing your degree sooner?

2. More availability.

While it’s true that course selections in general can be more limited during the summer, you may not have to fight your way into a spot for what is being offered. This means that even those highly coveted classes will have a lot more availability, which makes it much easier to take popular courses that are required for your degree.

3. Smaller classes.

Popular courses during the spring and fall semesters usually mean jam-packed classrooms. This can make it difficult to get a good seat, pay attention to lectures, ask questions, and have one-on-one discussions with your professor. Because fewer students opt for summer sessions, it also often means smaller classes. Not having to fight for a parking spot is a pretty great perk, too!

4. Cheaper textbooks.

Textbook prices might not be lower during the summer, but it could be easier to find used books. Most college students know that buying used textbooks can save them a bundle, but that’s the issue – most college students know it. That can make it difficult to find used textbooks at the college bookstore, especially for popular classes. It can even be hard to find them online, especially if you try to order them after the semester starts. Because fewer students attend the summer session, this means you won’t have to make a mad dash to the bookstore.

5. It can be a great time to take on classes you’re dreading.

Summer sessions are much shorter than typical semesters, and you’ll often finish up in about half the time you would any other time during the year. This can be either a good or bad thing, depending on how you look at it. The shorter semester usually means the class will meet more often and/or class sessions will be longer than usual. For some students, it can be overwhelming to fit an entire semester’s worth of work into half the time. But if you’re up for the challenge, you’ll probably be happy you did it in the end. Before you know it, the session will be over, and you’ll be done with those courses.

6. The potential to study abroad.

If you wanted to travel during the summer but you also like the idea of earning course credits, why not do both by studying abroad? Many study abroad programs take place during the summer, so depending on what your school offers, it could be your best opportunity. Studying abroad offers an experience like no other, and it may be something you want to seriously consider doing during your college career.

7. The opportunity to take on an internship.

Similar to study abroad programs, many internship programs are offered during the summer. If you are lucky enough to land an internship, you can gain invaluable experience in the industry you want to work in, and sometimes even get paid for it. Although you might not technically be in a classroom or on campus during the summer, you might still be able to earn credits during summer session this way.

If you do decide to enroll in a summer session, you’ll need to think about how to pay for it. If you’ve already reached your annual federal student loan limit, you may have other options, such as taking out a private student loan. Check out College Ave Student Loans to see the different loan options available, and see how you can build a loan that fits your budget and your life.

Source: https://www.collegeavestudentloans.com/blog/top-7-reasons-take-summer-classes/

5 TIPS FOR KEEPING UP YOUR GRADES IN COLLEGE

Even though college is more demanding than high school, it isn’t impossible to maintain good grades. The following are a few simple tips that you can start following now to make sure you graduate with flying colors.

  1.     Go to Class

Going to college is a completely different experience from going to high school. Now you’re on your own, and it’s up to you to make it to class, so it can be a lot more challenging than you might expect. Attendance may not be a requirement for passing a class, but it will certainly help you maintain high grades. Not only will you get all the necessary information, but you’ll be showing your professor you’re making an effort. Not to mention, in-class quizzes or assignments can help add a few points to your average.

  1.     Read the Syllabus

You should always make yourself familiar with the syllabus for every class. The syllabus gives you all the information you’ll need for the course, like which books you need and what assignments are due when, but it will also outline your professor’s grading procedures. Once you know this information, you’ll know the best way to tackle tests and projects to get the best grades. Basically, the syllabus is a map to the class, and it will be hard to find your way around the class without it!

  1.     Take the Right Classes

There are some classes that you just have to take, according to your school’s General Education requirements. But for your major classes, you should be taking the ones that most interest you. Chances are that you have a variety of classes to choose from for each section of the major, which gives you a lot of freedom. Take advantage of this and choose classes in line with your personal interests. For example, if you’re an English major, but you hated reading Jane Eyre in high school, take American Literature instead of British Literature, if given a choice. The more classes you can take that actually interest you, the higher your grades will stay.

  1.     Get Extra Help

If you’re struggling with a particular class, don’t be afraid to get some extra help. If it’s a large lecture-based course, there is most likely a Teaching Assistant that can do tutoring sessions. If it’s a smaller course, you can approach your professor directly during their office hours to get clarification on assignments or content. If neither of those options works for you, try organizing a study group with members of the class. If you’re struggling, chances are that others are, too. Studying together means more brainpower and different perspectives. Don’t forget about on-campus resources like the library and writing center; those are filled with student employees willing to help.

  1.     Get Organized

A lot of times, poor grades come not because students are incapable of doing well, but because they haven’t managed their time properly. Getting organized can put a massive boost on your grade-earning capabilities. If you don’t own a planner, get one, or use your phone’s calendar app. Write down your class and work schedules and set times that you will sit down and study or work on homework. Seeing your plan on paper (or on-screen) will help you understand that it’s a task that needs to get done.

For individual classes, invest in color-coordinated folders and notebooks. This will help you organize class syllabi and other information as well as your own notes you take in class. If you prefer to take notes on the computer, make sure you back them up with a cloud service, so they’re easy to access from any device.

Concluding Thoughts

Despite the challenges of college life, maintaining good grades is simple, as long as you follow the above tips. If you are attending interesting classes, staying organized, and staying motivated, you will be certain to achieve the grades you deserve.

Source: https://www.theedadvocate.org/5-tips-for-keeping-up-your-grades-in-college/